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Episode: The Empire Marches On

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As America fell into a state of hysteria the last week over the events in Charlottesville, the US imperial machine marched on. I get back to my roots in this episode. I speak briefly about the ouster of Steve Bannon and how that effects policy on Afghanistan. I hit on the literal fist fight at the top of world between India & China, Korean deescalation, the Saudi Crown Prince and I even give some reading recommendations.

NATO expansion continues in Europe, as the US Navy has decided to build bases in Ukraine and Moldova, showing America’s arrogance.

This week’s topics include:

Today’s episode.

The full archive of the show can be found here.

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Episode: Billy and The Boys

In this episode, I update you on India-China, North Korea and ask why no one on Facebook is sharing videos from Mosul, Iraq. I get domestic and discuss healthcare, Rand Paul’s good week, and the trans-ban.

episode link

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China Adds Troops To India Border, Will Defend Sovereignty At “Whatever Cost”
Why Is the World Not Outraged at Mass Civilian Death in Mosul?
North Korea claims all of U.S. in strike range as Trump says China has done “nothing”
One in every 45 people in Yemen is expected to contract cholera, Red Cross says
Thousands of worshippers surge into Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque, 113 injured
Rand Paul Blocks DOD Authorization Until September
White House Sacks Top Iran Hawk Amid Ongoing Disagreements

Episode: A Game of Thrones

In this episode I update you on the situation between Turkey and it’s NATO allies, especially Germany. I cover the protests at the Temple Mount in Israel, and point out that India and China both have nukes and don’t like each other very much.

Episode Link

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Mahmoud Abbas freezes contact with Israel over al-Aqsa
Six Killed, Hundreds Wounded as Violence Rages Across West Bank
US Urges All Nationals In North Korea To “Depart Immediately”, Bans Tourists From Visiting
Trump Ends Covert Aid to Syrian Rebels Trying to Topple Assad
Trump’s DOJ gears up for crackdown on marijuana
Germany overhauls Turkey policy
Germany continues war of words with Turkey, reviews arms sales
Turkey has over 680 German firms on terrorism black list: security source
Billions Of Lives At Stake As China Threatens India With War After “Blatant Sovereignty Infringement”

ZeroHedge: Russia & China Begin Construction of World’s Largest Gas Pipeline

If after months of Eurasian axis formation, one still hasn’t realized why in the grand game over Ukraine supremacy – not to mention superpower geopolitics – Europe, and the West, has zero leverage, while Russia has all the trump cards, then today’s latest development in Chinese-Russian cooperation should make it abundantly clear.

 

Overnight, following a grand ceremony in the Siberian city of Yakutsk, Russia and China officially began the construction of a new gas pipeline linking the countries. The bottom line to Russia – nearly half a trillion after China’s CNPC agreed to buy $400bn in gas from Russia’s Gazprom back in May. In return, Russia will ship 38 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas annually over a period of 30 years. The 3,968 km pipeline linking gas fields in eastern Siberia to China will be the world’s largest fuel network in the world.

Zerohedge

China Billionaire to Build Canal Across Nicaragua to Rival Panama Canal

In the mountains and rivers of Central America, work on one of the world’s largest infrastructure projects is progressing as planned, driven by Chinese billionaire Wang Jing.

With a planned capacity to accommodate ships with loaded displacement of 400,000 tons, the proposed 278-kilometer-long canal that will run across the Nicaragua isthmus would probably change the landscape of the world’s maritime trade, Wang, the billionaire behind the project, told the Global Times.

“The project is the largest infrastructure project ever in the history of man in terms of engineering difficulty, investment scale, workload and its global impact,” Wang, chairman and CEO of the HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co (HKND Group), told Global Times reporters in an exclusive interview on Thursday.

The Nicaragua Canal, which is about four times the length of the Panama Canal, will connect the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean upon its completion. The project is estimated to cost $50 billion. 

“Our canal lock is 15-meter-thick, hard steel. Imagine its size. [It’ll be] the world’s largest,” the 41-year-old Wang said.

The Nicaragua Canal project is just one of many giant infrastructure projects commenced by Chinese around the world. 

There are at least another five megaprojects that are currently being planned or under construction, including the $32 billion China-Pakistan economic corridor and the $1.7 billion Baltic Pearl Project, according to media reports. 

On July 7, a Nicaraguan committee approved the route of the canal, avoiding proposed routes that pass regions under border disputes.

“Now it is pending environmental and social impacts studies, which will lead to some changes, but the big picture is set up and the canal will be completed by 2019,” Wang said.

Wang’s company secured a 50-year concession for the canal and an extension right of another 50 years. 
In the mountains and rivers of Central America, work on one of the world’s largest infrastructure projects is progressing as planned, driven by Chinese billionaire Wang Jing.

With a planned capacity to accommodate ships with loaded displacement of 400,000 tons, the proposed 278-kilometer-long canal that will run across the Nicaragua isthmus would probably change the landscape of the world’s maritime trade, Wang, the billionaire behind the project, told the Global Times.

“The project is the largest infrastructure project ever in the history of man in terms of engineering difficulty, investment scale, workload and its global impact,” Wang, chairman and CEO of the HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co (HKND Group), told Global Times reporters in an exclusive interview on Thursday.

The Nicaragua Canal, which is about four times the length of the Panama Canal, will connect the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean upon its completion. The project is estimated to cost $50 billion. 

“Our canal lock is 15-meter-thick, hard steel. Imagine its size. [It’ll be] the world’s largest,” the 41-year-old Wang said.

The Nicaragua Canal project is just one of many giant infrastructure projects commenced by Chinese around the world. 

There are at least another five megaprojects that are currently being planned or under construction, including the $32 billion China-Pakistan economic corridor and the $1.7 billion Baltic Pearl Project, according to media reports. 

On July 7, a Nicaraguan committee approved the route of the canal, avoiding proposed routes that pass regions under border disputes.

“Now it is pending environmental and social impacts studies, which will lead to some changes, but the big picture is set up and the canal will be completed by 2019,” Wang said.

Wang’s company secured a 50-year concession for the canal and an extension right of another 50 years. 

In the mountains and rivers of Central America, work on one of the world’s largest infrastructure projects is progressing as planned, driven by Chinese billionaire Wang Jing.

With a planned capacity to accommodate ships with loaded displacement of 400,000 tons, the proposed 278-kilometer-long canal that will run across the Nicaragua isthmus would probably change the landscape of the world’s maritime trade, Wang, the billionaire behind the project, told the Global Times.

“The project is the largest infrastructure project ever in the history of man in terms of engineering difficulty, investment scale, workload and its global impact,” Wang, chairman and CEO of the HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co (HKND Group), told Global Times reporters in an exclusive interview on Thursday.

The Nicaragua Canal, which is about four times the length of the Panama Canal, will connect the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean upon its completion. The project is estimated to cost $50 billion. 

“Our canal lock is 15-meter-thick, hard steel. Imagine its size. [It’ll be] the world’s largest,” the 41-year-old Wang said.

The Nicaragua Canal project is just one of many giant infrastructure projects commenced by Chinese around the world. 

There are at least another five megaprojects that are currently being planned or under construction, including the $32 billion China-Pakistan economic corridor and the $1.7 billion Baltic Pearl Project, according to media reports. 

On July 7, a Nicaraguan committee approved the route of the canal, avoiding proposed routes that pass regions under border disputes.

“Now it is pending environmental and social impacts studies, which will lead to some changes, but the big picture is set up and the canal will be completed by 2019,” Wang said.

Wang’s company secured a 50-year concession for the canal and an extension right of another 50 years.

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Brazil, China, Russia & Others Move to Create Their Own “IMF”

Brazil, Russia discuss creation of BRICS bank

Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff and Russia’s Vladimir Putin have discussed the creation of a development bank to promote growth in Brazil, India, China, Russia and South Africa.

Rousseff received Putin in the presidential palace in Brasilia on Monday, a day before leaders of the five emerging BRICS nations meet in the northeastern city of Fortaleza.

Rousseff told reporters the bank would top the summit’s agenda, adding she hoped the event would produce an agreement on the proposed institution.

She said the five countries “are among the largest in the world and cannot content themselves in the middle of the 21st century with any kind of dependency.”

Brazil and Russia also signed bilateral accords on air defense, gas and education.

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China and Russia Officially Sign $400 Billion Gas Bill

The deal that I believe begins the geopolitical shift away from the United States, has officially been signed. For more details the background of this deal, check out my post here.

From the Washington Post:

With the stroke of a pen, Russia significantly shifted its economic relations with its neighbors, creating a major new export market to the east and reducing its reliance on European customers at a time when its relations with the West are at their lowest point since the Cold War…

…The 30-year deal was announced after meetings in Shanghai between Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping. It is worth an estimated $400 billion, Alexei Miller, chief executive of the Russian energy giant Gazprom, told Russian reporters…

…The deal marked a new partnership between two countries that have at times mistrusted each other but have also sought to counter U.S. influence in global affairs…

…The deal will involve developing natural gas fields in Russia and building pipelines from Russia to China. The cost of building the infrastructure alone is expected to top $70 billion, said Mikhail Krutikhin, an energy and oil analyst at RusEnergy, a Moscow think tank…

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Forget Obama’s “Pivot” to Asia, Let’s Talk About the Military’s “Pivot” to Africa

Nick Turse over that Tom Dispatch is pretty dominate in his coverage of American Imperialism in Africa.

“Unfortunately, there’s one place in that city’s global viewfinder that never seems to provides much of anything to riff off of, and so no fun whatsoever: Africa.  Yes, todayand Tuesday, Nick Turse continues his remarkable coverage of the U.S. military pivot to that continent, which promises a lifetime of chaos and blowback to come.

Admittedly, what’s happening isn’t your typical, patented, early twenty-first-century-style U.S. invasion, but it certainly represents part of a new-style scramble for Africa — with the U.S. taking the military path and the Chinese the economic one.  By the time U.S. Africa Command is finished, however, one thing is essentially guaranteed: a terrible mess and a lifetime of hurt will be left behind. This particular pivot is happening on a startling scale and yet remains just below the American radar screen. Explain it as you will, with the rarest of exceptions the U.S. media, riveted by Obama’s so far exceedingly modest pivot to Asia, finds the African one hardly worth a moment’s notice, which is why, today, without the usual combustible mix of what’s recently in the news and what’s newsmaking in Turse’s two pieces, I have no choice but to skip the introduction.”

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